Smith Colloquium

Spring 2021

COVID-19 Update: During the Spring 2021 the Smith Colloquium will be held on-line on Thursdays at 4:00 pm.

We cordially invite everyone interested in mathematics to attend.

Please contact Yannan Shen or  Agnieszka Międlar for arrangements.

Date Speaker, Title Local host
February 4 Organization Meeting
 
 
February 11 Joonha Park (KU)
Sequential-proposal Hamiltonian Monte Carlo with mass scaling for multimodal target distributions Abstract
 
February 18 Dionyssis Mantzavinos (KU)
A universal method for evolution partial differential equations posed in domains with a boundary Abstract
 
February 25    
March 4    
March 11    
March 18 Chenyang Xu (Princeton University)
Algebraic K-stability theory— one new theme connecting two old fields Abstract
Y. Jiang
March 25 Zhenghan Wang (University of California Santa Barbara)
Mathematics of topological quantum computing Abstract
Y. Jiang
April 1 Xiang Xu (Old Dominion University)
Blowup rate estimates of a singular potential in the Landau-de Gennes theory for liquid crystals Abstract
G. Chen
April 8 Chun Liu (Illinois Institute of Technology)
Energetic Variational Approaches in Active Materials Abstract
J. Feng
April 15 Grey Ballard (Wake Forest University)
Computing Tensor Decompositions using Parallel Algorithms Abstract
A. Miedlar
April 22 Ioana Banicescu (Mississippi State University)
TBD 
B. Pasik-Duncan
April 29 Yannan Shen (KU)
TBD 
 
May 6 Hong Qian (University of Washington)
TBD 
J. Feng

Events Calendar

Using Math

CTE course transformation grant helps Emily Witt, assistant professor of math, develop active learning with student groups in calculus.  Positive results using modules developed with Justin Lyle and Amanda Wilkens, math graduate students, were attained.  Read more

Math and COVID-19: Sources on how math is being used to track the virus and its spread.  AMS link.

A mathematician-musician's breakthrough melds East, West. Read more.

Researcher's innovative approach to flood mapping support emergency management and water officials. Read more.

Nicole Johnson found a way to express her baton twirling using math. See video.